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Image of Charles and Emma Lorena Hardy  Home - Charles and Emma Lorena Hardy  Home #12 on the walking tour
126 E. First North
Charles Milton Hardy and Emma Lorena Leavitt were married in February 1894.  In March 1894, they joined six other couples in what would become the permanent settlement of Mesquite.  Emma Lorena was the first school teacher in Mesquite and Charles was engaged in farming, raising stock, laying adobe brick, and plastering.

The original large one-room house was built from locally made adobe brick and lumber Charles hauled from Mt. Trumbull in Arizona.  In addition to a family living room and bedroom, the large room was also used as the first school and the first church (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) meeting hall in Mesquite. They added a lean-to to the house.  Its rooms were used as a bedroom and a kitchen. Nearby, they built an adobe granary with a big root cellar under it.  The root cellar would remain cool year round and was used for storage of food.  By 1920 more bedrooms and a screened porch had been added to the house, making it one of the largest homes in the Virgin Valley.

At first, the settlers got water for household use from springs along the Virgin River, later they built cisterns by their houses.  The Hardy's cistern was 15 feet deep.  They would fill it in the spring when the water from snow melt came down the Virgin River and the supply would have to last all summer.  After running water came to the Valley, a portion of the lean-to was converted to a bathroom with a cement bathtub - an event well remembered and retold over the years.  With the arrival of electricity in 1939 Emma had the first electric stove in working order.

Charles and Emma Lorena Hardy Home - Charles and Emma Lorena Hardy Home #12 on the walking tour 126 E. First North Charles Milton Hardy and Emma Lorena Leavitt were married in February 1894. In March 1894, they joined six other couples in what would become the permanent settlement of Mesquite. Emma Lorena was the first school teacher in Mesquite and Charles was engaged in farming, raising stock, laying adobe brick, and plastering. The original large one-room house was built from locally made adobe brick and lumber Charles hauled from Mt. Trumbull in Arizona. In addition to a family living room and bedroom, the large room was also used as the first school and the first church (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) meeting hall in Mesquite. They added a lean-to to the house. Its rooms were used as a bedroom and a kitchen. Nearby, they built an adobe granary with a big root cellar under it. The root cellar would remain cool year round and was used for storage of food. By 1920 more bedrooms and a screened porch had been added to the house, making it one of the largest homes in the Virgin Valley. At first, the settlers got water for household use from springs along the Virgin River, later they built cisterns by their houses. The Hardy's cistern was 15 feet deep. They would fill it in the spring when the water from snow melt came down the Virgin River and the supply would have to last all summer. After running water came to the Valley, a portion of the lean-to was converted to a bathroom with a cement bathtub - an event well remembered and retold over the years. With the arrival of electricity in 1939 Emma had the first electric stove in working order.

Object Type: Photo

Image of Jody Leavitt - Jody Leavitt

Jody Leavitt - Jody Leavitt

Object Type: Photo